artists represented

Nickolaus Seffrin
New tricks
2013
unique chrome coated mild
steel with applied bronze
72 x 46 x 13 cm
 
All works (excepting commissions) start with the thought, the possibility and the overall concept.Then follows the drawing, mainly on a flat sheet of 5mm metal. From this comes an outline in wire, making it 2-dimensional. This shape is then placed upright and beat into the desired movement. Further wire outlines are added to make the work 3-dimensional.

When the desired shape and movement has been achieved, a paper pattern is prepared of each surface to be covered. This pattern is then transferred to 3mm mild steel place, cut out with a welding torch, the edges being ground back and smoothed. 50 to 60 individual pieces are needed for the average work. The pieces are then applied and fitted to the existing armature and welded into place. Openings are left deliberately to enhance the lines and movement of the figure and also to highlight the nature of the material used – mild steel as opposed to bronze castings.

The next operation involves grinding back of the sculpture to remove any excess weld. Next follows sandblasting to ensure a uniform surface; wire-brushing and finally polychrome if the work has been designed with this final process in mind. Metal sculpture is therefore an extremely labour-intensive process – the advantage to the sculptor and collector is that each piece is one off – unique.

Polychrome (painting) is a process which has been used by most gothic woodcarvers, to firstly enhance the work and particularly ensure that in all lights, the work will reflects the colour to its best advantage. The paint used in the main (although not always) is a metal dye. After application the dye is brushed back to let the metal surface come through. The gold effect is achieved by reheating the work with a welding torch and melting a hot bronze onto the metal surface, thereby making it weather-proof.

My philosophy of sculpture is to take it (wherever possible) from the earthbound and to let it flow.

Nickolaus Seffrin
Brisbane, April 2002